In a Vase on Monday: floral perks

My Monday vases this week are full of flowers that a) I didn’t grow, b) I didn’t pay for, and c) I didn’t even pick. They’re all leftovers from our village Spring Show on Saturday. One of the perks of being on the gardeners’ association committee and helping to put on these shows is that you’re able to give a good home to any unwanted blooms that people leave behind.

I’m completely in love with the large pale pink tulip – it is one of the three stems that won ‘Best Exhibit in the Horticultural Section’ and they drew much admiration on the day. The woman who entered them didn’t know the variety of tulip but I think it could be ‘Pink Impression’. I also love the lily-flowered purple tulip which could be ‘Purple Dream’. If anyone knows for sure which varieties these are, please leave a comment below – thank you.

I was surprised by the number of entries of Narcissi because most of the daffs in my garden have either gone over or failed to flower. Only one of my beloved N. ‘Actaea’ has bloomed so far this year, the rest have come up blind. Talking to fellow gardeners around here, we reckon the very long dry summer last year is to blame. I’m hoping that if I feed and water them well this spring, they’ll recover and flower again next spring. If not, I’ll buy some more. (I’ll probably buy some more anyway!)

There was an impressive variety of beautiful Narcissi shown on Saturday and I was very lucky to bring a few home. They’re filling the room where I sit typing with the most delicious daffodil scent and brightening up a dull corner. There’s a white frilly edged tulip nestled in there, too, which could be ‘Daytona’. Again, if anyone knows, please let me know. I particularly like the pale daffs and have made a note to plant more this autumn. Good white and pale varieties are ‘Thalia’, ‘Elka’ and ‘Pueblo’. There are several multi-headed and highly scented varieties too. When you think of daffodils, it’s usually the traditional yellow version, but it’s amazing just how many varieties there are in all shades and combinations of yellow, cream and white, some with orange centres, tall and short, large flowers and small, single heads and multi-headed. As with most plants, there’s a variety to suit almost everyone.

It’s the school Easter holidays and with my two school-aged children off on their travels, I started the week off by having a lie-in. Bliss. It’s been such a full-on time recently that I’ve decided to take my foot off the pedal a little for a few days, to do as little around the house and as much out in the garden as possible. I hope you have a thoroughly good week, whatever you have planned.

As usual, I’m joining Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for her Monday vase gathering. Do visit her blog where you’ll also find links to other garden bloggers around the world.

11 thoughts on “In a Vase on Monday: floral perks

  1. Tulips and daffodils, how lovely to be able to bring these beauties home and enjoy the lovely fragrance. I love these little late flowering narcissi. Enjoy your time in the garden.

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  2. Oh you can have a really self-indulgent week, taking things slowly and enjoying the absence of children and the presence of all these left over flowers. The white fringed tulip is especially gorgeous. Thanks for sharing today, Sam, and enjoy your week

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  3. Taking your choice of the leftover blooms home is indeed a wonderful perk! Your week of downtime sounds great too. Enjoy your hours in the garden. I hope your weather fits your plans.

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  4. Beautiful flowers, I bet the show was lovely. The pale pink tulip caught my eye as well, it’s really pretty. I grew a few tulips for the first time ever this year and they’re just starting to bloom. Any day now the boys will drop a football on them, but in the meantime I’m enjoying them. May even manage a photo. I hope you have a good few days of relaxation, it is very well deserved I think. CJ xx

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  5. Lovely blooms and what a super perk!
    I’m afraid I don’t think that tulip is Pink Impression as I have it and it’s definitely darker – you can see it in my March End if Month view. And sorry, no clue what it is either, but would love to know too!
    Enjoy your week – I’m thinking of going crazy and taking Friday off as I’m off the island at the weekend and otherwise I’ll never get any gardening done – and at this time of year it’s so appealing!

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  6. Lovely, lovely daffodils. On this week’s GW they were saying that there are more varieties than ever – and Monty particularly loves Thalia. My tulips are just starting to show flower heads in this cold Spring. The N. Actaea and poeticus were childhood flowers that I love to this day. I grew up in the 1960s an only child in a big house in the country with a classic Edwardian garden of orchards and herbaceous borders. When I went to primary school I knew more flowers than I did other children. Vivid early memories of standing waist deep in these narcissi. Enjoy your mini-break at home!

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  7. Lovely bouquets! We tried a few bulbs in containers on our rooftop terrace and have been so happy with the way they signal Spring. But there are not nearly enough to bring inside to put in vases — the bouquets you brought home are inspiring. (that cerinthe with the pink tulip, yummy!)

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  8. Assembling them is enough to take credit for, isn’t it? For my articles, I regularly post pictures of redwoods that are centuries old, and a few that are many centuries old. Obviously, I didn’t plant them, and have never even pruned them.

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