Floriferous happenings

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I went to London on Friday to meet a friend. The weather was so summery that we bought a picnic lunch and walked to St James’s Park where we sat watching the world go by while we caught up on our news. It was blissful – London at its glorious, cosmopolitan, easy-going, bonkers best – and it was wonderful to see my friend; she is a tonic. Instead of coming home on the usual train, I went to meet David and travel home with him (we find our time when we can!). On the way we took a small detour via Wisley, arriving about an hour before the gardens closed, for a short walk and to avoid the worst of the Friday rush-hour traffic. Late afternoon when almost everyone else has gone home is quite possibly one of the best times of the day to visit. As we strolled along, enjoying the novelty of the near-empty garden, we caught sight of a sea of blue flowers. Bluebells? No, not in this part of the garden. What, then?

Camassias, that’s what. A huge swathe of Camassia leichtlinii subsp. suksdorfii (Caerulea Group) and Camassia cusickii which is the result of letting the bulbs naturalise in the grass in this part of the garden for the past few years. I’m not familiar with this lovely plant but, funnily enough, there was a feature about Camassias on Gardener’s World on Friday evening, too. The nurserywoman interviewed extolled their virtues as a fabulous garden plant for practically every condition. Seaside chalk? I’ll look into it.

How has your weekend been so far? It’s been warm, sunny and positively summery here but very annoyingly I have a stinking cold (or it could be much-worse-than-usual hay fever), so I’m not enjoying the balmy conditions as much as I usually would. I’ve hung out several loads of washing and I’ve pottered. That’s about the sum of it. And I’ve taken a few photographs to show you what’s looking lovely in our garden at the moment.

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I’m ashamed to say that I can’t remember which tulip this is. It looks like ‘Queen of the Night’ but I could be wrong. Anyway, whatever, I love the colour and the way it stands out against the new box foliage and the green grass.
Our apple blossom is coming out. I do love how the tight buds are deep pink and the petals white, blushed with pink.
Our apple blossom is coming out. I do love how the tight buds are deep pink and the petals white, blushed with pink. Apple blossom fills me with spring-y happiness.
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This clump of forget-me-nots has been flowering for weeks. It positively glows in the early morning sunshine or late evening gloaming.
Likewise, the pulmonaria, which has been flowering for months now. It's constantly buzzing with bees, so whatever you think of it, it earns a place in my garden for being such a good plant for pollinators. I tried to photograph a bee but they were too busy buzzing about.
Likewise, the pulmonaria, which has been flowering for months now. It’s constantly buzzing with bees, so whatever you think of it, it earns a place in our garden for being such a good plant for pollinators. I tried to photograph a bee but this one wouldn’t keep still, so it’s a black smudge. You can just make out its pollen-laden thighs if you look closely.
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Cassie, enjoying the hazy sunshine, Tulip ‘Arjuna’ among fading snowdrop foliage, and fresh geranium and gaura foliage. Erigeron is flowering on the wall in the background.
Our cherry tree is in full, blowsy, frothy bloom. Petals shiver down from the tree whenever there's a gust of wind and the lawn is dappled with pale pink confetti.
Our cherry tree is in full, blowsy, frothy bloom. Petals sprinkle down whenever there’s a gust of wind and settle into the creases and folds of the laundry on the line, and the lawn is dappled with pale pink confetti.

Wishing you a good week ahead.